TriYum App May 8 2024 Paul Fitzgerald Salt & Pepper Media

The launch of TriYum couldn’t have come at a better time. The app offers a number of solutions to a wide variety of bigger problems.

Almost 3,000 restaurants in the area have already expressed interest in our app and we are excited to offer an ecosystem where everyone benefits.”

— Evan Alcala, TriYum

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, UNITED STATES, May 8, 2024 /EINPresswire.com/ — “People need to eat – apps don’t,” states Evan Alcala, an entrepreneur based in Los Angeles.

Alcala has been running his own corporate catering business for the past 10 years, and he, like others, had to reinvent when the COVID-19 pandemic took its grip on the world four years ago.

Struggling to make ends meet during lockdowns and restrictions, Alcala turned to his mobile device to make money as an online food delivery driver.

At first, he thought that working as a driver would help pay the bills and put food on the table; however, not long after delivering meals to scores of households, he quickly learned that the only ones making the big bucks were the app companies themselves – not the drivers, nor the restaurants.

Then a light came on.

Alcala knew that it was time for a new app on the market, one that takes the food delivery experience to the next level by providing delivery drivers with proper compensation and better working conditions, while also supporting restaurants by not charging them with overwhelming fees that inhibit their ability to profit. Additionally, he knew a new app was needed with the customer being top of mind, providing them with a pleasant experience and guaranteeing that their order would come straight from the restaurant, hotter, fresher, and faster than the leading competitors.

Four years later, Alcala has just launched TriYum, an app that’s now in its beta-testing phase in Palms-Culver City – an area of Los Angeles that is decorated with fast food chains and local restaurants that offer all kinds of worldly-themed dishes.

“I remember driving for a few food delivery apps during the pandemic and making like $4 to $6 per-hour and working 12-hours or more a day,” recalls Alcala. “Then I noticed how many restaurants were being gouged with paying 30% or more on each order. I knew there had to be a better way, so that’s why I created an app that boasts fair food delivery for everyone: customers, restaurants, and drivers.”

The launch of TriYum couldn’t have come at a better time. The app offers a number of solutions to a wide variety of bigger problems.

The struggle in the food delivery app industry is real. In mid-February, food delivery app drivers, along with on-demand app drivers, went on strike in cities across the USA and Canada, demanding better pay and better work conditions.

To top it all off, restaurants in cities everywhere are now being more vocal than ever before, calling third-party delivery apps a disadvantage with their high commission fees. Many restaurants now even contend that most food delivery apps are hampering their businesses on many levels: loss of brand identity, less control over customer experience, data ownership issues, and reduced customer loyalty. Customers too, like food establishments, are also getting fed up with all the hidden fees.

TriYum however will be a game-changer in the food delivery app industry, which is expected to reach $165 billion market size by 2029.

The new app will offer subscription-based fees for both restaurants and drivers, and customers will be billed with a flat-rate delivery fee. The app will not include any hidden fees. Customers will also receive “true” restaurant pricing.

Here is a breakdown of the subscription-based fees: Restaurants – Average 40 cents per order (affordable tiered subscription plans for all sizes); Drivers – Unlimited deliveries for less than $1 a day; and Customers – Flat $5.99 delivery fee.

Alcala says Palms-Culver City is an ideal area for the app’s beta-testing phase.

“The area is diverse in terms of its restaurants and demographics,” explains Alcala.

“Almost 3,000 restaurants in the area have already expressed interest in our app and we are excited to offer an ecosystem where everyone benefits. Our future looks bright too: There are nearly 30,000 restaurants in LA County alone, and there are almost 750,000 restaurants across the USA, and we hope to make a positive impact in the food delivery app industry,” adds Alcala.

The owners of TriYum who helped make the app happen include Evan Alcala, Sandra Greenland, Cynthia Sears, and Daniel Sparks.

Visit www.triyumapp.com today.

Paul Fitzgerald
Salt & Pepper Media Inc.
+1 289-795-6176
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